# Plugins

Creating plugins in GrapesJS is pretty straightforward and here you'll get how to achieve it.

# Basic plugin

The most simple plugins are just functions that are run when the editor is being built.

  function myPlugin(editor){
      editor.BlockManager.add('my-first-block', {
        label: 'Simple block',
        content: '<div class="my-block">This is a simple block</div>',
      });
  }

  var editor = grapesjs.init({
      container : '#gjs',
      plugins: [myPlugin]
  });

This means that plugins can be moved to separate folders to keep thing cleaner or imported from NPM.

  import myPlugin from './plugins/myPlugin'
  import npmPackage from '@npm/package'

  var editor = grapesjs.init({
      container : '#gjs',
      plugins: [myPlugin, npmPackage]
  });

# Named plugin

If you're distributing your plugin globally, you may want to make a named plugin. To keep thing cleaner, so you'll probably get a similar structure:

/your/path/to/grapesjs.min.js
/your/path/to/grapesjs-plugin.js

Important: The order that you load files matters. GrapesJS has to be loaded before the plugin. This sets up the grapejs global variable.

So, in your grapesjs-plugin.js file:

export default grapesjs.plugins.add('my-plugin-name', (editor, options) => {
  /*
  * Here you should rely on GrapesJS APIs, so check 'API Reference' for more info
  * For example, you could do something like this to add some new command:
  *
  * editor.Commands.add(...);
  */
})

The name my-plugin-name is an ID of your plugin and you'll use it to tell your editor to grab it.

Here is a complete generic example:

<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-2.2.0.min.js"></script>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="path/to/grapes.min.css">
<script src="path/to/grapes.min.js"></script>
<script src="path/to/grapesjs-plugin.js"></script>

<div id="gjs"></div>

<script type="text/javascript">
  var editor = grapesjs.init({
      container : '#gjs',
      plugins: ['my-plugin-name']
  });
</script>

# Plugins with options

It's also possible to pass custom parameters to plugins in to make them more flexible.

  var editor = grapesjs.init({
      container : '#gjs',
      plugins: ['my-plugin-name'],
      pluginsOpts: {
        'my-plugin-name': {
          customField: 'customValue'
        }
      }
  });

Inside you plugin you'll get those options via options argument

export default grapesjs.plugins.add('my-plugin-name', (editor, options) => {
  console.log(options);
  //{ customField: 'customValue' }
})

This also works with plugins that aren't named.

  import myPlugin from '../plugin'

  var editor = grapesjs.init({
      container : '#gjs',
      plugins: [myPlugin],
      pluginsOpts: {
        [myPlugin]: {
          customField: 'customValue'
        }
      }
  });

# Named Plugins vs Non-Named Plugins

When you use a named plugin, then that name must be unique across all other plugins.

grapesjs.plugins.add('my-plugin-name', fn);

In this example, the plugin name is my-plugin-name and can't be used by other plugins. To avoid namespace restrictions use basic plugins that are purely functional.

# Boilerplate

For fast plugin development, we highly recommend using grapesjs-cli which helps to avoid the hassle of setting up all the dependencies and configurations for development and building (no need to touch Webpack o Babel configurations). For more information check the repository

  • https://github.com/artf/grapesjs-preset-webpage
  • https://github.com/artf/grapesjs-preset-newsletter
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